Sheepdog

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he Polish Tatra Sheepdog, or Polski Owczarek Podhalanski, is a very old livestock guardian dog from the Tatra Mountains of Poland. The breed probably shares some ancestry with mastiff breeds that came to Europe from Asia. The breed almost disappeared during World War II.

These big white mountain dogs stand between 23 and 27 inches tall and weigh 110 to 150 pounds. The head is broad with a long muzzle, the eyes are dark, and the ears are dropped. The body is slightly longer than tall, and the tail is long and profusely feathered. The white coat is thick and either straight or slightly wavy. There is a thick undercoat. The coat should be brushed at least twice weekly for most of the year. When the undercoat is being shed, usually in the spring and fall, the coat needs a thorough brushing, making sure to get through the undercoat to the skin, every other day.

Although puppies can be rowdy and playful, for the most part this is a calm breed. Daily walks and a chance to run and play will satisfy the exercise needs of most dogs.

As with most livestock guardian dogs, the Polish Tatra Sheepdog was bred to think for herself and to solve the problems she faced on a daily basis. When training this breed, the owner must be the dog's leader and then must convince the dog that what she is doing is important. When properly motivated, these dogs are quick, eager learners. Socialization is very important, as these dogs are natural guardians and can be quite territorial.

The Polish Tatra Sheepdog is not for the first-time dog owner; this breed needs someone who understands the nature of livestock guardian dogs. This is also not a city dog; she will bark loudly at any perceived threat. She is wonderful with children, although she will not be happy about rough play with your kids' friends. She is good with other pets (although she may try to herd them) and is not as dog-aggressive as some other livestock guardian breeds. The primary health concern is hip dysplasia.

Breed in Brief

Registries: Polish Tatra Sheepdog Club of America, Polish Tatra Sheepdog Club of Canada Occupation: Livestock guardian Size: 23 to 27 in tall; 110 to

150 lbs Longevity: 9 to 11 years Exercise: Moderate Training: Challenge Grooming: Sheds

Polish Tatra Sheepdog 321

omerantan

his adorable toy breed traces its family tree back to sled dogs in Iceland and Lapland. At that point, the dogs probably weighed between 20 and 30 pounds and were used to herd sheep. In the mid-1800s, the breed was introduced to England, and Queen Victoria fell in love with the breed. The breed was gaining popularity in the U.S. by the late 1800s, although the dogs were bigger and heavier boned and had larger ears than the Poms we know today.

Pomeranians today are very small dogs, most weighing between 3 and 7 pounds (show dogs weigh between 4 and 6 pounds). Height is between 8 and 11 inches. The Pom's body is slightly shorter than it is tall at the shoulder and, although small, should feel sturdy. The head is rounded, with a short, fine muzzle, dark, bright, almond-shaped eyes, and small, erect ears. The tail is plumed and lies flat on the back. The Pom has a double coat, with a soft, dense undercoat and a long, straight outer coat. The outer coat stands out rather than lying close to the body. Colors include red, orange, cream, black, brown, brindle, and parti-color.

Show Poms have a lovely coat that makes the entire dog look like a powder puff. The majority of pet Poms, however, do not have this coat; instead, they have a lush coat that tends to lie down. In either case, the coat needs to be brushed two or three times a week to prevent tangles and mats from forming. Poms are very clean dogs. Cayla Horn's Pomeranian, Keely, will lick her paws after tfi cr*

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Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Companion, performance sports Size: 8 to 11 in tall; 3 to 7 lbs Longevity: 14 to 16 years Exercise: Moderate Training: Challenge to housetrain Grooming: Moderate eating and then wipe her face with her damp paws.

Although very small, Poms still need daily exercise, but their diminutive size makes this easy. A short walk will do, as will a game of ball thrown across the living room or down the hallway. They are happiest when active and love to train on the agility course or chase a small flying disc.

Housetraining Pomeranians can be a challenge, but with close supervision, perseverance, and patience, it can be accomplished. Poms are also protective little watchdogs, and barking, if uncontrolled, can become a problem. Training should continue past puppyhood to keep the breed's bright mind active and learning. Poms excel in trick training and love to be the center of attention. These dogs have participated very successfully in several dog activities, including obedience competition, agility, and therapy dog work.

Poms are happy, affectionate little extroverts who make great pets for the elderly. They are too fragile for very small children but can be wonderful companions for gentle older children. Interactions with other dogs must be carefully supervised, both because Poms are so tiny and because Poms have no idea how small they are and often try to control the situation with other dogs. Poms are usually good with other pets, although they may try to chase the family cat. Health concerns include knee problems, hypoglycemia, eye problems, and tracheal collapse.

Pomeranian 323

oodle (Toy)

't is generally accepted that all Poodles (toys, miniatures, and standards) are the same breed of dog. The standard variety is the oldest; you can read about the breed's shared history on page 326. But Toy Poodles are not new; Louis XVI of France had toys, and many paintings from the 15 th and 16th centuries show tiny dogs that look much like today's Toy Poodles.

Toy Poodles stand 10 inches tall or less at the shoulder and weigh 5 to 7 pounds. There is no official size other than this; the Poodle Club of America does not recognize teacup toys or tiny toys. The head is moderately rounded, with a long muzzle. The eyes are dark and oval, and the ears are dropped. The tail is docked. The coat is curly and dense. Coat color should be one solid color and may be apricot, silver, cream, black, blue, or one of many other colors.

Grooming the Toy Poodle is a complicated process. Show dogs must be groomed in a specific cut that requires some knowledge, so potential owners who wish to show their dogs should discuss this with a breeder prior to buying a dog. Pet owners often take their dogs to a professional groomer on a monthly basis; potential owners should be aware of the cost. Between grooming sessions, the dog should be brushed every other day to prevent matting.

The Toy Poodle is an active dog but is small enough that her exercise needs are easily met. She will enjoy daily walks but can also play in the house.

Toy Poodles are bright and intelligent but are easily spoiled and, when spoiled, can be very demanding. Fun training, including housetraining, should begin early so the dog grows up understanding household rules. Toys also need early socialization, as they can be wary of strangers.

Toys are great companions for people who spend time at home. Most breeders will not sell Toys to families with young children, as the dogs can be fragile. Health concerns include Addison's disease, Cushing's disease, eye defects, luxated patellas, and epilepsy.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Companion Size: 10 in tall or less; 5 to 7 lbs

Longevity: 14 to 16 years Exercise: Moderate Training: Moderate; easily spoiled Grooming: Difficult

oodle (Miniature)

ll three sizes of Poodles share the same history (see the Standard Poodle profile on the next page), but each size also has some unique characteristics. It is said that at some point during its history, the Miniature Poodle gained fame in England, Spain, and Germany as a truffle dog. The breed's fine nose found the subterranean fungus, which was sold as a delicacy.

The Miniature Poodle stands between 10 and 15 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 13 to 16 pounds. The head is moderately rounded, with a long muzzle. The eyes are dark and oval, and the ears are dropped. The tail is docked and carried high. The coat is curly and dense. Coat color should be one solid color and may be apricot, silver, cream, black, blue, or one of many other colors.

Grooming the Miniature Poodle takes time, effort, and knowledge. Pet owners usually take their dogs to a professional groomer every four weeks; potential owners should be aware of the cost. Between grooming sessions, the dog should be brushed every other day to prevent matting. Show dogs must be groomed in a specific cut, which can be difficult to do and requires effort to maintain, so potential owners who wish to show their dogs should discuss this with a breeder prior to buying a dog.

The Miniature Poodle is usually said to be the calmest of the three sizes. Although active and playful, she is also very willing to snuggle with her owner. She will enjoy walks, playtimes, and training on the agility course. Miniature Poodles have done very well in canine sports, including agility and obedience competitions, and in therapy dog work.

Early training and socialization are important for this variety of the breed, just as it is for the others. Housetraining requires patience.

The Miniature is an excellent family dog. The dogs who are a little larger are great with children who play gently with them. Health concerns include Addison's and Cushing's diseases, epilepsy, eye disorders, and luxated patellas.

Cushings Disease Apricot Poodle

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Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Companion Size: 10 to 15 in tall; 13 to 16 lbs

Longevity: 13 to 15 years Exercise: Moderate Training: Easy Grooming: Difficult

Poodle (Miniature) 325

oodle (Standard)

one knows for certain where Poodles originated. They were popular in many parts of Europe, including Germany and France, and everyone wanted to claim these versatile dogs as their own. Most experts agree that the Standard variety is the oldest and was a water retriever. In fact, the practice of trimming the coat was intended to aid the dog in swimming.

Standard Poodles stand taller than 15 inches at the shoulder; most are between 21 and 27 inches tall. They usually weigh between 50 and 75 pounds. The Poodle Club of America says, "There is no officially recognized Poodle variety such as Royal Standard." The head is moderately rounded with a long muzzle. The eyes are dark and oval, and the ears are long and dropped. The tail is docked. The coat is curly and dense. Coat color should be one solid color and may be white, apricot, cream, black, blue, or one of many other colors.

Grooming the Standard Poodle is a complicated process. Show dogs must be groomed in a specific cut that requires some knowledge and considerable upkeep, so potential owners who wish to show their dogs should discuss this with a breeder. Pet owners often take their dogs to a professional groomer on a monthly basis; potential owners should be aware of the cost. Between grooming sessions, the dog should be brushed every other day to prevent matting.

The Standard Poodle is an active dog who needs vigorous daily exercise. She should go for a run, go for long walks, train on the agility course, or play flyball.

The Standard Poodle also needs training. This is an intelligent dog who may be quite large; she needs to learn basic obedience but is capable of much more. Early socialization is also recommended, as this breed can be wary of strangers.

This breed needs an owner who enjoys grooming and who wishes to do things with the dog. Standards are good with children and other pets. Health concerns are many and include Addison's and Cushing's diseases, epilepsy, eye disorders, hip

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Retriever, companion Size: 15+ in tall; 50 to 75 lbs Longevity: 12 to 14 years Exercise: Vigorous daily exercise Training: Needs to be challenged Grooming: Difficult dysplasia, and thyroid disease.

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