Smooth

ox Terriers have a rich history going back at least 300 years, if not longer, and have been used as the foundation breed for several other breeds. Although the Wire Fox Terrier and Smooth Fox Terrier were shown together for many years, and in early years were bred together, experts agree that they come from different backgrounds. The Smooth Fox Terrier is probably descended from a smooth-coated black and tan terrier breed, the Bull Terrier, the Beagle, and, most likely, a dash of Greyhound.

The Smooth Fox Terrier stands 14 to 15.5 inches tall and weighs 15 to 19 pounds, although weight is less important than the dog's fitness. The head is long and wedge-shaped, the eyes small and dark, and the ears small and V-shaped. The body is strong and fit and shorter than the dog is tall. The tail is docked. The coat is short and hard and is predominantly white with patches of color.

The short coat should be brushed twice weekly.

This is a very active dog who needs vigorous daily exercise. A securely fenced yard is advisable; this dog is not particularly suited to apartment living. She enjoys daily runs, playtime on the agility course, and a chance to hunt for rodents and bugs in the woodpile. Without enough daily exercise, this dog will find something to amuse herself, and that could be destructive.

Early training is recommended. Because Smooth Fox Terriers are bright, they are able to think for themselves. Firm and structured yet fun training can help teach household rules and social manners.

The Smooth Fox Terrier needs an owner who understands the terrier temperament, their love of fun and activity, and their ability to be hardheaded at times. This breed can be good with older children but may be too rowdy for younger kids. She is not always good with other dogs, especially those of the same sex, and should not be trusted with smaller pets. Health concerns include hip and knee problems, allergies, and Cushing's disease.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Vermin hunter Size: 14 to 15.5 in tall; 15 to 19 lbs

Longevity: 13 to 15 years Exercise: Very active Training: Challenge Grooming: Easy

Fox Terrier (Smooth) 241

ox Terrier (Toy)

nlike the Smooth and Wire Fox Terriers, the Toy Fox Terrier did not originate in England. This is, instead, a recently yk developed American breed. Smooth Fox Terriers

V^^B^V were crossed with several toy breeds, including

Chihuahuas, Italian Greyhounds, Miniature Pinschers, and perhaps even Manchester Terriers. The resulting dogs are both true terriers (with strength, stamina, and gameness) and true toys (with a more livable disposition).

Toy Fox Terriers stand 8.5 to 11.5 inches tall with weight proportionate to height. They are small yet well-balanced and strong. The eyes are dark and round, and the ears are upright and large, never dropped. The tail is docked. The coat is smooth, fine, and predominantly white with patches of color.

Brush weekly with a soft bristle brush or rubber curry comb.

This is an active dog who is playful and animated, yet not as busy or intense as the Smooth and Wire Fox Terriers. She enjoys daily walks. She is also suited to many dog sports, including agility, flyball, obedience, and terrier go-to-ground competitions. She is active enough to get into trouble, however, if left alone for too many hours.

Early socialization is important. Although normally outgoing and friendly, some Toy Fox Terriers can be reserved and wary of strangers, and early socialization can help build their confidence. Training should begin early, too, as this is a very intelligent breed. Training should be fun and not too repetitive, yet firm and structured. Toy Fox Terriers really enjoy mental challenges, so training should continue into adulthood. Teach the dog hand signals, scent discrimination, and trick training. As with some other toys, housetraining can sometimes be a challenge.

This breed can be a good family dog as long as children are not too rough. She can be a great companion for an active senior citizen. Health concerns include knee problems and allergies.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Companion Size: 8.5 to 11.5 in tall; weight proportionate to height

Longevity: 13 to 14 years Exercise: Active and playful Training: Moderate Grooming: Easy

ox Terrier (Wire)

he Wire Fox Terrier is descended from the old English black and tan, rough-coated terrier from Durham and Wales. Although for many years the Wire and Smooth Fox Terriers were bred and shown together as one breed with two coat varieties, they were recognized as separate breeds by the American Kennel Club in 1985.

The Wire Fox Terrier is first and foremost a hunting terrier and should be fit and fast. She stands 14 to 15.5 inches tall and weighs 15 to 19 pounds. Her head is long and wedge-shaped, with small dark eyes and V-shaped ears. Her body is shorter than she is tall. Her tail is docked. The coat is double, with a soft undercoat and a hard, wiry, broken outer coat. The color should be predominantly white with patches of color.

This coat does require dedicated grooming, including regular brushing, combing, and trimming. The undercoat does shed. Show dogs are hand-stripped, although most pets are groomed with clippers.

This is a very active breed that requires daily exercise. Walks are not enough; these dogs need to run, play, train in agility, or hunt for small animals and insects in the brush. All exercise should be in a fenced-in yard because if a small animal is flushed, Fox Terriers will be after it in a flash.

Training is very important, as Wire Fox Terriers are very bright. Training that is fun yet firm and structured can help keep the dog's mind challenged, and the dog will then be less prone to getting into trouble. When well motivated, these dogs enjoy many canine sports, including agility, flyball, and terrier go-to-ground tests.

Wire Fox Terriers do best in a home where the owner understands the terrier mindset. An active owner can best keep this breed busy and out of trouble. Wires do well with older children but may be too rowdy for very small kids. They should not be trusted with smaller pets. Health concerns include hip and knee problems, allergies, and Cushing's disease.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Vermin hunter Size: 14 to 15.5 in tall; 15 to 19 lbs

Longevity: 13 to 15 years Exercise: Very active Training: Challenge Grooming: Difficult

Fox Terrier (Wire) 243

rench Bulldog xperts have debated, and continue to debate, the origins of this breed. A small English Bulldog, perhaps one as small as a toy, may be one of the ancestors, but there were probably several different breeds in France that were crossed with the Bulldogs in the late 1800s. One of the distinguishing features of the breed today is the upright bat ears; early American breeders can be credited with establishing this feature. European dogs of this time period had the rose ears of the English Bulldogs.

The French Bulldog stands 10 to 12 inches tall and generally weighs between 16 and 28 pounds. The head is large and square, with a domed forehead. The muzzle is very short. The eyes are large and dark; the bat ears are upright. The body is muscular and heavy-boned. The tail is straight or screwed. The coat is short and smooth; many colors are acceptable, but brindle and white or brindle and fawn are the most common.

This breed's coat should be brushed twice weekly. The wrinkles on the face should be cleaned daily. Frenchies are relatively low-activity dogs, although they do like to play and enjoy long walks. Their short muzzles makes them prone to breathing difficulties, though, so exercise should be avoided during hot, humid weather.

Training should begin early. Although Frenchies are companion dogs, they can also have a mind of their own. The French Bull Dog Club of America says, "Although cute and cuddly-looking, a French Bulldog has a big personality and needs an adequate amount of training to make it a civilized companion." Housetraining can sometimes be a challenge.

This breed makes an excellent companion for a sedentary person who is home quite a bit. Although this breed can be good with children, she prefers adults to active kids. Unfortunately, as a brachycephalic (short-muzzled) and dwarf breed, French Bulldogs do have some health concerns, including breathing problems, back disorders, and difficulties with anesthesia.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, CKC, UKC Occupation: Companion Size: 10 to 12 in tall; 16 to 28 lbs

Longevity: 12 to 14 years Exercise: Low activity level Training: Challenge to housetrain Grooming: Easy

erman Pinscher lthough the German Pinscher was one of the breeds used to create the Doberman Pinscher, breed experts feel it is more closely related to the much older Standard Schnauzer. The German Pinscher is thought to be a descendant of the now extinct German Rat Pinscher. Bred to protect home and family, this working breed is also a fervent vermin hunter.

This is a medium-sized breed, standing between 17 and 20 inches tall with weight proportionate to height. The head is wedge-shaped, with either upright cropped ears or V-shaped natural ears. The eyes are medium in size, dark, and oval. The body is compact and muscular without being bulky. The tail is docked. The coat is short and smooth. Colors include fawn, red, blue, and black, with or without tan or rust markings.

This is an easy-to-groom breed. The coat can be brushed weekly with a soft bristle brush or curry comb.

German Pinschers are naturally busy. Walks, jogs, playtimes with a ball, or training sessions on the agility course will all be enjoyed. All off-leash play sessions should be inside a fenced-in yard, because if a small animal is flushed, these dogs will chase!

Early socialization is extremely important. This is not a large dog but is still a very watchful and protective one. The German Pinscher is wary of strangers and willing to carry out his protective threats. Early training is also vital. This breed is bright and intelligent but can be strong-willed, manipulative, and stubborn. Training should be firm and structured yet fun, and should continue from puppyhood into adulthood.

This breed needs an experienced owner, preferably one who understands the breed's temperament. He needs supervision with children, as he will not tolerate disrespect or rough handling. He can be aggressive with other dogs, and interactions with small animals should be limited and closely supervised. Health concerns include eye problems and hip dysplasia.

Breed in Brief

Registries: AKC, UKC, CKC Occupation: Guardian, vermin hunter Size: 17 to 20 in tall; weight proportionate to height Longevity: 13 to 14 years Exercise: Active and busy Training: Hard to keep challenged; stubborn Grooming: Easy

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