Your detailed guide to housetraining

Now that you have the basic principles down (after reading the previous section), you can discover how housetraining will work in your busy day. Take a look at these guidelines, or post them on your refrigerator (and for more reading, check out Housetraining For Dummies, by Susan McCullough [Wiley]).

If you decide to paper-train your Dachshund — or, like one senior owner I know, allow him to use the extra shower stall as his "litterbox" — the same guidelines apply, except that you whisk him off to his inside elimination station.

^ Before bringing your puppy inside the house for the very first time, take him to his elimination station while he's still attached to his leash and stay there until he does his duty.

If he won't eliminate, take him inside, put him in his den, close the door, and tell him in a gentle voice that you'll be back. Return in 15 minutes and try again. Don't take him anywhere else in the house until he has eliminated in his special spot.

^ Every two hours during the day for the first week, take him out to his special spot.

If he doesn't go, bring him in and put him in his den (nicely — don't get mad or none of this will work). Return every 20 to 30 minutes and try again until he goes. (Note: Your puppy may have a stronger bladder, and you may find that you can take him out every three or four hours rather than every two. But start with two-hour intervals until you know your Dachshund's tendencies.)

If you have to work all day and nobody will be home, have someone come by every few hours to let out your puppy. If you can't find a willing friend or family member, consider hiring a pet sitter. These professionals spend much of their days walking and playing with puppies and adult dogs for people who can't get home from work for long periods of time.

1 Within 30 minutes of a meal, take him outside until he goes.

After you learn your puppy's e-time (see the section "Timing is everything"), you can alter this step to fit your puppy's needs.

1 For the first week, take your puppy out every four hours during the night.

Set your alarm if you have to, but your Dachshund will probably wake you up. (If he's sleeping soundly, you can wait it out, but don't miss the opportunity when he wakes up.)

1 Always take your puppy out first thing in the morning, at the same time each morning, and immediately before bedtime, at the same time each evening.

Sorry, that means on weekends, too! Continue this habit throughout your Dachshund's life. (You can always go back to bed after the bathroom break.)

1 Never, ever miss the sniff-and-circle routine.

If you or someone else can't watch him, let your puppy rest in his crate where he'll be much less likely to have an accident.

For the first couple of weeks, be extra vigilant. It could happen any time, even when an elimination session isn't scheduled. After your Dachshund is housetrained, keep the concept in the back of your mind. Everyone forgets about letting the dog out every now and then. And note that after an extra-big meal, your Dachshund may need more outside time than usual.

1 For the first couple weeks, keep your Dachshund in uncar-peted areas whenever he's out of his den.

Cleanup will be much easier, and the scent won't last like it will in carpet. (Purchase a reliable odor remover specifically designed for pet odors; see Chapter 8.)

1 If your Dachshund makes a mistake, remember that it's your fault, not your Dachshund's.

Don't get mad. You can behave with urgency when whisking your Dachshund outside if you catch him in the act. You can say "No!" sternly and even sharply, which may interrupt him mid-accident so you can get him outside before he finishes. But don't yell at him (even if you're extremely irritated, which you very well may be), and for your dog's sake, don't hit him or rub his nose in his transgression (or, I should say, your transgression). He won't get it. He really won't. It will just make things worse, and he'll learn to fear you.

Dachshunds are fastidious, clean animals, and they lack the typical hound-dog odor. They don't want to eliminate in a manner that displeases you, and they don't want to mess up their living environments. They need only a little guidance from you to do what makes everyone happy. Be a patient, consistent, and loving housetrainer.

To help you keep track of when to take your Dachshund outside in the first week, make a copy of Table 13-1 (or make your own version) and circle the appropriate time of each successful elimination. The chart lists times in two-hour intervals throughout the day and four-hour intervals throughout the night, assuming that your Dachshund gets up at 7 a.m. and goes to bed at 11 p.m. Times are approximate. Modify them for your own schedule.

Table 13-1 Daily Elimination Schedule

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

9 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

11 a.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

1 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

3 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

5 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

9 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

11 p.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

3 a.m.

Dog Potty Training

Dog Potty Training

This is for people who want to potty train their dog NOW. Discover The Ability To Finally Potty Train Your Dog In No Time! I'm going to get right down to it... If you've found this page, either you or someone you know has a puppy that needs to be potty trained. Maybe you've tried a ton of various methods you've read about but have had no success. How can some people potty train their puppy with hardly any effort?

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment