Dumbbell Exercises and Lifting Routines

Dumbbell Routines and Exercises

If you don't look really good and muscular naturally (and lets face it Who does?) it can be hard to motivate yourself to go to the gym. Why would you want to go when it just doesn't seem to do any good? On top of that, your schedule is often far too busy to keep going to the gym consistently. This guide gives you workouts that you can do quickly without all of the hassle of going to the gym all the time. All you really need to get a great body is a set of dumbbells and (ideally) a bench of some kind! You'd be amazed at how much you can do just by using dumbbells to get where you need to get with your body. You can look amazing in a tank top! You don't have to be ashamed of how you look Start looking amazing by doing simple, easy workouts! The simplest workouts are the best; they are easier on your body! Read more...

Dumbbell Routines and Exercises Summary

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Author: Mike Westerdal
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The writer presents a well detailed summery of the major headings. As a professional in this field, I must say that the points shared in this manual are precise.

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Say Give take out the dumbbell and reward with food

At this point in the training, your dog may not yet take the dumbbell but will open his mouth. In that case, just put the dumbbell in, cup his mouth shut, and so on. If he sits there like a bump on a log, watch for signs of intention behavior. Intention behaviors are those actions that tell you what the dog is thinking (see Chapter 1). They range from the subtle, such as bringing the whiskers forward, to the overt, such as sniffing the dowel, licking his lips, or intently staring at the dumbbell. Buddy is thinking about taking the dumbbell but isn't quite sure he can. When you see intention behavior, take your hand out of the collar, open his mouth, put the dumbbell in, and briefly cup his mouth shut. Praise, remove the dumbbell from his mouth, and reward with food. Repeat until Buddy readily opens his mouth and accepts the dumbbell. Praising him while he has the dumbbell in his mouth is important. Be patient. Sometimes it can take several minutes before the dog makes a move. If...

As the dog gains confidence have the distracter stand a little closer and then over the dumbbell

The distracter also hides the dumbbell by standing directly in front of it with his back to the dog, and then lightly puts his foot on it. You can use a chair as a distraction by putting the dumbbell under the chair and then on the chair. He starts going toward the dumbbell but then backs off and fails to retrieve, meaning, I don't have the confidence to get close enough to the distracter to retrieve my dumbbell. Remedy Without saying anything, slowly approach him, put two fingers of your left hand through the collar, back to front, palm facing you, at the side of his neck and take him to the dumbbell. If he picks up the dumbbell, praise, remove the dumbbell and reward if he doesn't, put the dumbbell in his mouth, and then praise, remove, and reward. Don't repeat the command. i He permits himself to be distracted, meaning, I would rather visit than retrieve my dumbbell. i He takes the dumbbell to the distracter. Remedy Without saying anything, slowly approach him, take the dumbbell...

Two feet before you get to the jump throw the dumbbell and let go of your dog

Continue to approach the jump and, as he picks up the dumbbell and turns around to look at you, focus his attention on the center of the jump. 6. Praise, take the dumbbell, and release. 2. Put two fingers of your left hand through his collar and throw the dumbbell. 5. As he commits himself to return, back up so he has enough room to land, take the dumbbell, and release. 6. Repeat until he stays without two fingers in the collar and returns without any help from you, and throw the dumbbell at least eight feet beyond the jump. from the jump and throw the dumbbell at least eight feet beyond the jump. Anytime your dog goes around the jump on the return, slowly approach him and put two fingers of your left hand (palm facing you) through the collar at the side of his neck, back to front. Take him back to where he picked up the dumbbell, say Stay (he can Stand, Sit, or Lie Down), go over the jump yourself to the other side, focus his attention on the top board, step back, and tell him Jump....

Dumbbell Size

Training Dog Dumbbell Jump

When teaching a dog to retrieve, it is important to use a dumbbell of correct size for the dog. The length of the bar should be about one inch more than the width between the dog's eyes for unobstructed vision. The bells should keep the bar far enough off the ground for the dog to grasp it behind his canine teeth without touching the ground with his nose. The bar should be large enough not to rock in his mouth and pinch his lips but not so large that he drools. Study the size of your dog's mouth carefully before selecting or making a dumbbell. Paint the bells white your dog may be able to locate the dumbbell more easily and perform better in competition. Do not paint the bar. Figure 21- The next step involves retrieving the dumbbell. With your dog sitting at your heel and the leash attached as before, say Stay and throw the dumbbell over the hurdle about a foot beyond the spot where he lands. Be sure he cannot see the dumbbell until he jumps the hurdle otherwise he will simply...

Start in the usual position with Buddy at your left side and the treats on the chair

Put the dumbbell into his mouth and say, Hold it. If you hold the palm of your hand under his chin, Buddy may construe it as an invitation to spit out the dumbbell. 5. Praise, remove the dumbbell, and reward him with food. 6. Repeat 20 times, increasing gradually the time you have him hold the dumbbell in 5-second increments up to 30 seconds. If Buddy starts rolling the dumbbell around in his mouth or looks as though he will open his mouth to spit out the dumbbell, give him a gentle tap under the chin with Hold it. Then remove the dumbbell with Give, praise, and reward.

Learning to reach for the retrieve

As soon as Buddy understands that he has to hold the dumbbell, the next sequence is to teach him to reach for it. 1. With two fingers of your left hand through his collar at the side of his neck, back to front, palm facing you, hold his dumbbell two inches in front of his mouth. 3. If he does, cup his mouth shut with Hold it, count to five, praise, remove dumbbell with Give, and reward with food. 4. If he doesn't take the dumbbell, lightly twist his collar by rotating your left hand a quarter of a turn toward you, which will bring his head forward and toward the dumbbell, until he reaches for and takes it. 5. Cup his mouth shut with Hold it, count to five, praise, remove the dumbbell with Give, and reward with food. 6. Put the dumbbell in his mouth, cup shut with Hold it, praise, remove, and reward. 7. Repeat until your dog voluntarily reaches for and takes the dumbbell. Increase the distance Buddy has to reach for the dumbbell in two-inch increments to arm's length. If he is a...

Introducing the object of retrieve

As soon as Buddy has an inkling of what the command Take it means, you're ready to introduce him to his dumbbell. But going from food to a dumbbell is quite a transition, so you need to be patient with him. 2. Gently open his mouth and with your right hand place the dumbbell in his mouth with the command Take it. 4. Praise enthusiastically, immediately say, Give, and take the dumbbell out of his mouth. Hold the dumbbell by the bell so you can easily put the bar in his mouth. After one second, take it out with Give. Putting the dumbbell in your dog's mouth. Putting the dumbbell in your dog's mouth. The goal of this progression is for your dog to accept the dumbbell in his mouth voluntarily. It's only an introduction and you don't want to close his mouth over the dumbbell for longer than one second. When Buddy readily accepts the dumbbell consistently, you can go on to the next sequence.

Praise as he lands and release backward giving him a treat

Few people can throw the dumbbell so that it always lands in the right spot, and some people never get it there. So you may as well teach your dog to jump from different angles. Leave Buddy facing the right upright of the jump, ten feet away. Go to the other side by stepping over the jump, focus his attention on the center of the top board, take three steps backward, pause, and say Buddy, jump. Repeat the exercise by having Buddy face the left upright. Getting Buddy to jump while holding the dumbbell Sequence 4's goal is to get your dog to jump while holding the dumbbell Have Buddy hold the dumbbell and follow the progressions in Sequence 3. Here, you're teaching the Return Over the Jump part of the exercise.

Walking after retrieving

The next step in the retrieve progressions is teaching Buddy to hold onto the dumbbell while walking with it in his mouth. Okay, you're probably saying to yourself, For Pete's sake, is all this really necessary The answer It depends on the dog. At this point in the training, the majority of dogs understand the concept and are perfectly able to hold the dumbbell in their 1. With Buddy sitting at your left side, facing the chair with the treats on it from about six feet away, put the dumbbell in his mouth with Take it, followed by Hold it. 3. When he gets to the chair, praise, remove the dumbbell, and reward him. 4. Repeat until Buddy walks with the dumbbell without you holding your hand under his chin.

Repeat until your dog holds the Stay without having to hold him by the collar

Remember to give the command in an excited and enthusiastic tone of voice to put the dog into prey drive. Never use a harsh or threatening tone of voice because your tone of voice may put the dog in the wrong drive and make it more difficult for him to learn. If at anytime your dog needs motivation, throw the dumbbell at the same time as you say, Take it, letting him chase after it. Congratulations. You now have a dog that retrieves on command at least a dumbbell. To play the game of fetch, however, most people probably use a Frisbee, a ball, or a stick. Few dogs have any difficulty making the transition from the dumbbell to one of these objects. Usually, it's the other way around. The dog will happily retrieve a ball but will turn his nose up at the dumbbell.

The Open Class Whats Expected from You and Buddy

The first obedience test was held in 1933 and consisted of what are now the Open class exercises. For the Retrieve on the Flat, the dumbbell weighed 2 pounds. The Retrieve Over High Jump was a 3-foot-6-inch obstacle, and the dumbbell weighed 8 to 10 ounces. The Broad Jump was 6 feet wide.

The Scent Discrimination

Maybe you've already taught your dog the Find Mine trick with dollar bills (see Chapter 24). If so, this exercise should go quickly. The only difference between the two is that you perform the Scent Discrimination exercise with metal and leather articles, usually dumbbells, five of each. Buddy is first required to retrieve one, either metal or leather, and then the other, which you have scented, from among the remaining four leather and four metal.

The Retrieve Over the High Jump

The principal features of this exercise are that your dog jumps over the jump, picks up the dumbbell, and promptly returns with it over the jump. The judge's commands are Throw the dumbbell, Send your dog, Take it, and Finish. Your commands to Buddy are Stay, Jump, Give, and Buddy, heel.

Chasing to retrieve

Now comes the fun part, where you get to throw the dumbbell and Buddy gets to chase it. Throw the dumbbell a few feet and at the same time send your dog with Take it. As soon as he picks up, tell him how terrific he is. When he gets back to you, take the dumbbell with Give and reward him with a treat. Sometimes dogs get carried away by the fun of it all and don't come right back with the dumbbell. They might make a detour, or just run around for the joy of it. If that happens, say, Come, as soon as he picks up the dumbbell, and praise and reward him when he gets back to you. Gradually increase the distance the dumbbell is thrown. As he gains confidence, introduce the Sit in front with Hold it. When he gets back to you say, Sit and Hold it. Because he hasn't done this task before, you may have to hold your hand under his chin to prevent him from dropping the dumbbell. Praise, remove, and reward. From now on make him sit and hold the dumbbell every time he gets back to you.

The Retrieve on Flat

For this exercise, the judge tells you to throw the dumbbell and then send your dog, who's expected to retrieve the dumbbell, present to front, give up the dumbbell on command, and then finish on command. Your command sequence is Stay, Take it, Give, and Buddy, heel. Buddy must do all the other parts of this exercise on his own. You also may need to review the teaching progressions for the Front while your dog is holding the dumbbell. For your dog, a Front with the dumbbell isn't the same exercise as a Front without a dumbbell. It becomes a new exercise. You need to review the Front progressions in Chapter 14 with Buddy carrying the dumbbell in his mouth. How quickly Buddy will generalize the Front while carrying the dumbbell depends on the extent to which the exercise is in harmony with his instincts. Retrievers, for example, do it almost automatically, but other breeds may need a few repetitions.

Training Schedule

In the first week of training you must first teach your dog to accept and hold the dumbbell. Say Take it while pushing it gently but firmly against his teeth. if he resists, force his mouth open by pressing with your thumb and finger just behind his canine teeth. Figure 12- Retrieve on Flat. In the first week of training you must first teach your dog to accept and hold the dumbbell. Say Take it while pushing it gently but firmly against his teeth. if he resists, force his mouth open by pressing with your thumb and finger just behind his canine teeth. Figure 13- Praise him as soon as he takes the dumbbell. Stroke his nose and throat to keep it in his mouth. Then say Out and remove it. Figure 13- Praise him as soon as he takes the dumbbell. Stroke his nose and throat to keep it in his mouth. Then say Out and remove it. Figure 14- In the second week of training teach your dog to reach for the dumbbell. Hold it several inches from his nose and say Take it. if...

Getting Started With Dumbbells

Getting Started With Dumbbells

The use of dumbbells gives you a much more comprehensive strengthening effect because the workout engages your stabilizer muscles, in addition to the muscle you may be pin-pointing. Without all of the belts and artificial stabilizers of a machine, you also engage your core muscles, which are your body's natural stabilizers.

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