Ep Ep

When you catch your puppy's curiosity leading him astray, say EP, EP in a gently discouraging tone. For example, if you see him heading toward a tissue basket or starting to jump on the couch, interfere by saying EP, EP. The words are best reinforced with a short directional tug of the collar. Avoid touching your puppy when you do so, as any touch is perceived as interactive. If grasping your puppy's collar is difficult, attach a short drag lead (see page 35) for easier intervention. My puppy...

Resolve Nipping

If your dog is under 12 weeks he's simply testing waters and his nips are more an indication that he's feeling needy than confrontational. Similar to a child who cries when a need is not met, a puppy will nip. His needs include hunger, thirst, play, sleep, and elimination. If you have an older puppy, he has learned that nipping is interactive and may be doing this to get attention and promote his sense of control. Try these techniques to resolve nipping Ask yourself if your puppy or dog is...

Teaching Food Bowl and Toy Acceptance

Dogs are not born with an innate concept of sharing. Without specific conditioning and training, they will never acquire it. Although some dogs will submit to a person's interference while they're eating or chewing a toy, most consider the intervention a nuisance some dogs even become aggressive. It's important to teach your dog to share at as young an age as possible. Let your dog know that your arrival is not an attack and that you're there to congratulate her, not steal her prize.

Acknowledgments

As always, there are so many people to thank from the head of the dog to the tail that wags it. Pam Mourouzis, you are an inspiration to write for. Handing me off to Jenn Connolly was a great move thank you. I don't know if it was more enjoyable to haggle over text or what to do about our children's teething and tantrums. Jenn you are a joy to work with. Jodi and Laurie my photographers although not one of these photos will hang in a gallery, each is indispensable for the people who are...

Continued On Next Page

Soon your dog will be a willing cooperator. Now you can practice some variations on the theme. Gradually rotate your hand until your fingers are pointed up and your dog is slapping your open palm When your dog is hitting the mark consistently, hold your hand back a few inches, and as he lifts his paw, say WAVE as you wave at him. First, practice in a quiet area using STAY to gain distance one foot at a time. Say WAVE as you gesture, initially praising your dog for the slightest lift of a paw....

Develop Sensory Awareness

Your dog depends on her five senses to understand what's going on around her. Understand this and you'll understand your dog a lot better. As you read, keep reminding yourself that no matter how much you love your dog and no matter how much she loves you she is not human. Her worldview is different. Understanding how she discovers and explores things will help you be a better teacher. Smell is your dog's strongest sense. It is many thousand times stronger than your own sense of smell. She...

Understand Pack Theory

Before you can train your dog to listen to you, you need to understand just what makes her tick. Although you may not look like a dog, your dog responds and respects you as though you were. Straight down the canine ancestral line, dogs habituate behavior that is reflective of pack theory where one is the leader and the others respect the leader's direction. Training is based on this instinct. Long ago, dogs were domesticated from the wolf, and many of their social instincts remain the same....

Teach Civil Greetings

Dogs jump in greeting to get closer to your face. Teach your dog that sitting has the same effect. If your dog jumps when greeting you, fold your arms over your face and look up. When she calms down, brace her by looping your thumb over her collar. Pet her lovingly and teach her the meaning of SAY HELLO to sit calmly for greeting . When company visits, ignore your dog until she's calm. At this point, bring her to the visitors and brace her see above if she's excited or overwhelmed. Encourage...

Keep Your Pup from Tinkling

Keep your departures and arrivals low-key. Do not get excited when you arrive. Make treat cups and place one by the door. When you get home and after your dog calms down shake the cup and encourage him to do a trick see chapter 9 or play with a toy, and then offer him a treat. Play a come-and-go game Go in and out the door fifteen times in a row. Each time you return ignore your dog's hyperactivity, only reconnecting once he's calm then use your treat cup as described above. Secure a greeting...

Understand Cause and Effect

Your dog will learn what behaviors to repeat based on what happens when she does them. If, for example, you push your dog off of you when she jumps, she will jump again, as dogs consider pushing to be rough play. On the other hand, if you hold a treat above her head, and when she jumps you lift the treat up and wait patiently until she sits before you reward her, she will learn to sit when she wants things. The same holds true for many other behaviors. If your dog is frantic at the door and is...

Learn to Interpret Doglish

Your dog's language let's call it Doglish does not consist of thoughts, statements, reasoning, or contemplation. Doglish consists of momentary choices and quick interpretations. Your dog relies on three vehicles for communication eye contact, body language, and tone. Similar to human beings, dogs naturally look to their leaders for direction. The leader of the group is always kept within sight. The first question to ask yourself is are you looking to your dog more than she is looking to you If...

Teach Name Association

Help your dog make a positive association with her name. 1 Call her name and mark the moment she looks to you with praise or other rewards. Note You can also use a clicker or a target word to mark the moment your dog comes to yours your side. 2 Shake a treat cup, calling your dog's name as you run away from her. Throw your voice away from your dog when calling her. Praise her attention. Note Use a strong directional tone when calling to your dog, similar to the one a football quarterback would...

Introduce Stairs

Many puppies are thrown off by stairs their eyes can't make sense of the depth and angle. Although it is tempting to soothe and carry your puppy, resist this habit. It will only teach him to be helpless. Instead, encourage a can-do mentality. 1 With a helper and some treats, approach the stairs with your puppy in your arms. Carry him to the third step from the top or bottom. Place him down gently. 2 Without talking, support your puppy's rib cage to alleviate his fear of falling. 3 Have your...

Discourage Nipping

When Dog Licks Your Hand

First, teach your dog an appropriate alternative to mouthing, such as KISSES, which means licking, not biting tongue, not teeth. Spread butter or another creamy spread on your hand and say KISSES as your dog licks it off. Puppies under twelve weeks are very mouthy. Do not correct soft nipping until they are older. Teach them to inhibit their bite by shouting OUCH when they bite down too hard. Remember, too, that young dogs nip to communicate needs, similar to an infant's cry. Immediately...

Your Dogs Worldview

Before you jump into training your dog and strengthening your relationship, it is important to understand exactly what motivates your dog's happiness. Understanding how your dog thinks, views your home, and communicates with you is possible once you look at the world from your dog's perspective. The impulses that relate him to a breed or a mix of breeds , his personality, and his energy level are all aspects of your dog that will shape his worldview and his association to you. Your first step...

Read Your Dogs Postures

Dog Postures

Learning to read your dog's postures may be easier than controlling your own. When trying to understand what your dog is experiencing, look to her ears, tail, mouth, body posture, and eyes. Rigid forward pitch assertive, assertive and dominant posture Moving back to front aware of surrounding sounds Angled back submission, invitation to play Hanging loosely relaxed TAIL Arched high above the back high alert, dominance Tucked under belly fear, submission Just above rear end alert but open and...

Selecting an Older

Adopting an older dog can be a lot easier than taking in a puppy. The cute factor isn't a distraction. You usually test one dog at a time, not ten. But if you have a bleeding heart, a dog's story can draw you in, even though her temperament may not be suited for your lifestyle. Nothing is sadder than rescuing an older dog and then having to return her because she doesn't mesh with your lifestyle. Here are some things to consider ahead of time Do you have children Make sure you introduce them...

Displacement Activities

If your hope is that your puppy will stay with you while you relax with a good book, give him a comfortable place to sit and a good bone to chew. Have one special chew bone or object that your puppy only sees at dinnertime or when company visits. Stuffing a little peanut butter into his regular chew can be exciting. Use this object for those times when you really need your dog to calm down. If suddenly your puppy starts to fidget, ask yourself if he needs to go out or wants some water. Pet him...

Teach Your Dog Waitokay

O Bring your dog on her training collar and leash to the threshold of a doorway. As you approach the doorway, say WAIT. 2 If she stops, praise her. If she doesn't, say NO and tug her back to your side. 3 Reinstruct WAIT, saying OKAY and leading her forward only after she has complied. 4 Go to your front door and repeat steps 1-3, both going in and coming out. Note If you have a fenced-in environment, there may be times when you don't need to accompany your dog out the door. In that case,...

The Invisible Leash

If your dog can control himself while he's off-leash, you have even more freedom and more opportunities to have fun together. Off-leash training gives you a companion who will choose to respond to your direction over distractions, one who will listen to you reliably and choose to follow your direction. The transition from on-leash to off-leash control takes patience and time, and it means constantly reading your dog and being aware that your dog is also reading you. Because you have relied on...

Distraction Exercises

Lay distractions on the floor in your living room. Try an open potato chip bag, a used wrapper, or a paper towel. Bring your dog into the room on his leash and training collar. Tug the leash if necessary and say NO if he focuses more on the object than on you review the exercise on page 84 . Next, increase the level of floor distractions. Add some bits of food or another pet. Work through the commands SIT, DOWN, HEEL, and COME, correcting any lack of focus with the command NO. Redirect your dog...

Recognize Spatial Aggression

The first two levels are Coveting laying her head over the object A short warning growl emanating from her throat. By demonstrating aggression at these levels, your dog is letting you know that she does not want to be bothered and would prefer privacy when eating, chewing, or playing with an object this is known as spatial aggression. She must learn to share if she is to live happily with people.

Flip Negatives to Positives

It is easy to get frustrated or angry at a dog or a child, and sometimes a mix of the two can be overwhelming. Plan ahead of time and make a list of activities you can use as an alternative to yelling at either one of them. Close shop cross your arms over your face and look up instead of saying, Don't push the dog when he jumps. Teach KISSES with butter instead of getting angry at perpetual nipping. Use treat cups and games to motivate your children's participation in lessons versus pinning...

Learning to Speak Doglish

When training your dog, it's important to look at the world from her perspective. She simply can't understand your world or your interactions as another human being would. In fact, your dog thinks of you and your family as other dogs in her pack. Understanding her way of communicating and how she learns and views your interactions is the topic of this chapter. Understand Pack Understand Your Dog's Play on the Same Team Encourage More Than You Discourage 15 Learn to Interpret Doglish 16 Read...