Showing Your

Dog shows, whether breed, obedience, agility, or many dog sports, are the most popular meeting ground of dog lovers. Some shows have more than 3,000 entries. They provide an opportunity to learn more about dogs, make new friends, and travel. They also provide an opportunity to get up at ridiculously early hours in the morning, drive many miles, spend hours outdoors in bad weather, and eat bad food, all in the pursuit of a ribbon. It's a funny game, played with a dog for a partner.

Many titles, such as obedience and agility titles, can be attained without having to win over other dogs, leading to a special camaraderie with others who participate. Everyone cheers for everyone else. Showing dogs has led me to lifelong friendships that I treasure. Best of all, showing dogs gives me goals that challenge me to perfect my communication with my dog.

Showing your dog can be an experience that is beneficial to your relationship with your dog, but it can also be detrimental. It is wonderful to travel with your dog to shows, sharing quality time together and the challenge of showing. On the other hand, the lust for wins and the ego gratification they bring can sometimes lead owners to neglect their dogs' needs. The search for a winning show dog can result in an accumulation of dogs, whereby you can find yourself giving up the quality of human-dog relationship. It is important to keep in mind that dog shows satisfy people's needs, not dogs'.

Dog Owners Handbook

Dog Owners Handbook

There are over a hundred registered breeds of dogs. Recognizing the type of the dog is basically associated with its breed. A purebred animal belongs to a documented and acknowledged group of unmixed lineage. Before a breed of dog is recognized, it must be proven that mating two adult dogs of the sametype would have passed on their exact characteristics, both appearance and behavior, to their offspring.

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