Mastering Basic Training

In This Chapter

^ Using a leash

^ Teaching the basic skills: sitting and staying ^ Keeping your dog from bolting ^ Behaving at the dinner table m ^ne question almost every dog owner asks is, "How do I keep my dog ^^ from jumping up on people?" Dogs jump on people as a form of greeting, like saying, "Hello, nice to meet you!"

Dogs have perfected different styles of greeting behaviors. Bean, our Labrador, would literally launch himself from a distance of about six feet to greet us. Cece, our Dachshund, would jump up and scratch our legs. Neither style is acceptable.

Dogs perceive jumping on people as a friendly gesture, a dog's way of letting the object of his affection know how happy he is to see him or her. He's literally jumping for joy. You can train your dog to greet people in a less rambunctious fashion, but you don't want to punish your happy pet simply because he's glad to see you.

Even more annoying is the dog's habit of sniffing parts of our anatomy we prefer he didn't. Although this behavior may be normal for the dog — he uses his nose to identify the rank, gender, and age of other dogs he meets — you need to insist that he gets this information from people in a less intrusive way.

So how do you get him to stop these behaviors without dampening his enthusiasm? By teaching him to Sit and Stay on command. Your dog can't jump on you when he's sitting — the two behaviors are mutually exclusive.

You also need to teach Buddy a release word to let him know he can move again after you've told him to stay. If you don't release him from the command after a reasonable period of time, he'll release himself, and the length of time he stays will become shorter and shorter. Our release word is "Okay," meaning "You can move now." Another frequently used release word is "Free," or "Free dog."

100 Dog Training Tips

100 Dog Training Tips

100 Dog Training Tips EVERY Dog Owner Should Know. Utilize These Tips to Train Your Dog to Be Obedient and Smart.

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